Birmingham School of Law alumna Karen Lawrence Puccio has been selected to join the National Trial Lawyer’s Top 40 Under 40 for 2018.

Birmingham School of Law alumna Karen Lawrence Puccio has been selected to join the National Trial Lawyer’s Top 40 Under 40 for 2018. Those selected for the honor have contributed to their company’s growth and success, are key leaders in their organizations, play a critical role in the community, and will play a key role in the Birmingham business community in the future.

Puccio is an attorney with Hare Wynn where she focuses on Personal Injury and Mass Tort litigation. She served on the team involved in the metal-on-metal hip replacement cases involving DePuy Orthopedics and Stryker Rejuvenate. She also has been instrumental on the MDL work for Bard and Cook IVC filter cases.

A native of Centreville, AL, Puccio earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminology at Auburn University and went on to attend Birmingham School of Law at night while working full-time as a case manager. She began her legal career as an attorney working primarily in Mass Tort and Personal Injury law. In just two years after becoming an attorney, Puccio was named co-lead of the asbestos department for her prior firm where she helped obtain more than $15 million in settlements for clients. She also has successfully litigated in asbestos cases.

When Puccio is not in the office, she enjoys spending time with her family. She is an avid fan of Auburn athletics and her pastimes include running, fishing, and entering chili cook-offs. In fact, she is a former Tennessee State Chili Champion and was a participant in the World Championship Chili Cookoff.

Puccio believes that anything is possible with hard work, and she has a passion for helping others. That passion for helping people is felt within the Birmingham community through her work for the Birmingham Bar’s Volunteer Lawyers Program. “The program provides legal assistance to low-income clients who are in desperate need of help and who do not have access to legal counsel,” she says. “I feel privileged to be able to help these individuals who otherwise would not receive the help they need.”